Category: Art & CULTURE

By Shaye Weaver   shaye.weaver@amny.com 

A new year brings new art to New York City.

As we say “goodbye” to 2017, there’s much to look forward to in the art world in the coming year, including a giant portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin made out of 5,000 bullet shells.

The piece, which stands roughly 8 feet, 5 inches tall, is one of five pieces in an art installation by Ukrainian activists Daria Marchenko and Daniel Green, called “Five Elements of War.” Putin’s face is made out of bullet cartridges gathered during Russia’s military conflict with Ukraine in Donbas.

Other artworks to keep an eye out for are less political in nature, including 3-D paper sculptures by Bodys Isek Kingelez at the Museum of Modern Art; Andy Warhol’s “Green Coca-Cola Bottles” at the Whitney Museum of American Art; a personal archive of 400 objects belonging to David Bowie, including his costumes and lyrics sheets, at the Brooklyn Museum; and an exhibit of photography by younger artists at MoMA.

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December 7 – 10, 2017

In our American show, leading galleries from North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia and Africa show significant work from the masters of Modern and contemporary art, as well the new generation of emerging stars. Paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, films, and editioned works of the highest quality are on display in the main exhibition hall. Ambitious large‐scale artworks, films and performances become part of the city’s outdoor landscape at nearby Collins Park and SoundScape Park.

ARTSY SPECIALIST NOV 29TH, 2017 For one week a year, Miami becomes a global destination for art and design. You can stroll through an art fair, and then go to the beach. (Or, you can skip the flight and browse the fair booths online.) From Alex Israel to Mickalene Thomas, discover seven artists that will get […]

For her first solo museum exhibition in New York, Toyin Ojih Odutola presents an interconnected series of fictional portraits, chronicling the lives of two aristocratic Nigerian families.

Ojih Odutola (b. 1985) creates intimate drawings that explore the complexity and malleability of identity. Depicted in her distinctive style of intricate mark-making, her sumptuous compositions reimagine the genre and traditions of portraiture.

Rendered life-size in charcoal, pastel, and pencil, Ojih Odutola’s figures appear enigmatic and mysterious, set against luxurious backdrops of domesticity and leisure. They, and the worlds they inhabit, are informed by the artist’s own array of inspirations, which range from art history to popular culture to experiences of migration and dislocation. Highly attentive to detail and the nuances of space, class, and color—whether of palette or skin—Ojih Odutola continues her examinations of narrative, authenticity, and representation.

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Ballet Hispánico, the nation’s premier Latino dance organization, in collaboration with the Apollo Theater, presents three inspiring works that reflect on the migrant experience, the tragedy of marginalization, and the resilience and triumph of the human spirit.

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“Living in America,” part of a manifesto that was written on wooden panels traveling with the model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City (1929–58), evokes a question that preoccupied architects and planners throughout the mid-twentieth century. Wright’s idealized plan for an exurban settlement of single-family homes offered one possible answer; plans for large public or subsidized housing located in urban areas presented another. Although these two visions seem a world apart, they share a common history.

Wright (1867–1959) first exhibited his Broadacre City project at Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan in 1935. While the prominent, Wisconsin-based architect anticipated a degree of economic diversity, Broadacre’s residents were, for the most part, implicitly white. In 1936 construction began on one of New York City’s first public housing developments, the Harlem River Houses, funded by the Public Works Administration under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.

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The Studio Museum in Harlem Presents Their Own Harlems by over Fifteen Artists including Dawoud Bey, Jacob Lawrence, Julie Mehretu, Wardell Milan, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

In honor of the centennial of the birth of Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), Their Own Harlems examines the ways in which the urban landscape has influence Lawrence’s artistic practice, as well as that of other artists.

Known primarily for his bodies of work that depict historical figures, Lawrence was also a keen observer of contemporary life, drawing inspiration throughout his career from the years he spent living in Harlem. He thought of Harlem in a broad sense, acknowledging the powerful and positive experiences people of African descent across the country could find in “their own Harlems.”

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DELANO DUNN:
NO ONE CAN BE THIS TOMORROW

Long Gallery Harlem
2073 7th Avenue at 124th Street

(February 1, 2017 – New York, NY) – Long Gallery Harlem is pleased to announce the opening of No One Can Be This Tomorrow, a solo exhibition of work by Delano Dunn that explores the false promise of true freedom and equality in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil Rights movement, and the election of Barack Obama, all moments of jubilation in Black America.

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Long Gallery Harlem Presents The Moon Is My Only Luxury Solo Exhibition of work by Elizabeth Colombo

The Moon is my only luxury is the inaugural presentation of the newly opened Long Gallery Harlem, featuring a solo exhibition of works by Elizabeth Colombo. The focus of the exhibition is a survey of her portraits of women comprised of approximately twenty two oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings from 1997 to the present.

To RSVP, please email info@long.gallery.

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