Art &
CULTURE

“BALLET HISPÁNICO SHOWS WHAT IT IS TO BE LATINO IN THE MODERN WORLD.”

Ballet Hispánico, the nation’s premier Latino dance organization, in collaboration with the Apollo Theater, presents three inspiring works that reflect on the migrant experience, the tragedy of marginalization, and the resilience and triumph of the human spirit.

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Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem, and Modern Housing

“Living in America,” part of a manifesto that was written on wooden panels traveling with the model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City (1929–58), evokes a question that preoccupied architects and planners throughout the mid-twentieth century. Wright’s idealized plan for an exurban settlement of single-family homes offered one possible answer; plans for large public or subsidized housing located in urban areas presented another. Although these two visions seem a world apart, they share a common history.

Wright (1867–1959) first exhibited his Broadacre City project at Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan in 1935. While the prominent, Wisconsin-based architect anticipated a degree of economic diversity, Broadacre’s residents were, for the most part, implicitly white. In 1936 construction began on one of New York City’s first public housing developments, the Harlem River Houses, funded by the Public Works Administration under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.

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Exhibition – Their Own Harlems

The Studio Museum in Harlem Presents Their Own Harlems by over Fifteen Artists including Dawoud Bey, Jacob Lawrence, Julie Mehretu, Wardell Milan, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

In honor of the centennial of the birth of Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), Their Own Harlems examines the ways in which the urban landscape has influence Lawrence’s artistic practice, as well as that of other artists.

Known primarily for his bodies of work that depict historical figures, Lawrence was also a keen observer of contemporary life, drawing inspiration throughout his career from the years he spent living in Harlem. He thought of Harlem in a broad sense, acknowledging the powerful and positive experiences people of African descent across the country could find in “their own Harlems.”

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Long Gallery Harlem Presents – DELANO DUNN: NO ONE CAN BE THIS TOMORROW

DELANO DUNN:
NO ONE CAN BE THIS TOMORROW

Long Gallery Harlem
2073 7th Avenue at 124th Street

(February 1, 2017 – New York, NY) – Long Gallery Harlem is pleased to announce the opening of No One Can Be This Tomorrow, a solo exhibition of work by Delano Dunn that explores the false promise of true freedom and equality in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil Rights movement, and the election of Barack Obama, all moments of jubilation in Black America.

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Long Gallery Harlem Presents The Moon Is My Only Luxury

Long Gallery Harlem Presents The Moon Is My Only Luxury Solo Exhibition of work by Elizabeth Colombo

The Moon is my only luxury is the inaugural presentation of the newly opened Long Gallery Harlem, featuring a solo exhibition of works by Elizabeth Colombo. The focus of the exhibition is a survey of her portraits of women comprised of approximately twenty two oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings from 1997 to the present.

To RSVP, please email info@long.gallery.

For more information about the event, please click here.Read More

Peg Alston Fine Arts

Fall for Art

When it comes to fine art there is no other place to take in a private viewing than at the exclusive Peg Alston Fine Arts gallery. Located on Central Park West this small quaint space features world renowned artists.

The current exhibition has works by Todd Williams, Phoebe Beasley, Antonio Carreno, Ed Clark, Romare Bearden, Ike Ude, James Green and Elizabeth Catlett.

If you’d like to stop by for a viewing, email peg@pegalston.com!

Peg Alston Fine Arts
407 Central Park West, Suite 1C
(between 100 & 101 streets)
New York, NY 10025
Phone: 212-663-8333

The Sol Experience with Lewis Long

Sol Studio – Interview with the Founder Lewis Long

Charlie Lewis: How did the Sol Studio come about?

Lewis Long: We wanted to celebrate the African American community. And being so closely located to cultural institutions such as the Apollo and the Studio Museum of Harlem, as well as the national jazz museums that celebrate African American culture … we wanted to be a part of that. Another inspiration point was the photography of James Van Der Zee.  We initially thought it would be photography-related, and wanted to bring that visual to a new level with today’s technology and social media. This way we could provide positive images for and of the people in the neighborhood that allow them to feel good about themselves and share them to new networks.Read More

American Art

The Whitney Museum is one of my favorite places to catch up on the art world. What I love most about the new Whitney is that it’s not trying too hard, and the designers of the space considered the building and its offerings from every possible angle — there are five outdoor areas to complement the full structure.  With Fall approaching, it starts getting chilly, which could deter you from walking out and experiencing the breathtaking views of Manhattan, but bundle up and do it! It’s well worth a little nip to see the city from this vantage point. The museum is a ‘grown and sexy’ place for a date. It’s also a great way to spend time by yourself, wandering around checking out some of the latest collections/exhibits and people-watching. While there, make sure you check out the Studio Cafe on the top floor; I recommend stopping in as it’s a bit quieter. The restaurant Untitled on the 1st floor is quite the scene, as it’s run by the Danny Meyer Hospitality Group. So if a scene is what you’re looking for, stay on the 1st floor and feel impressed with yourself that you also took in a little bit of culture. The museum stays open late on Friday and Saturdays to 10pm.Read More